What’s in My Buds? With David Brancaccio

On the lastest edition of What’s in My Buds? we chat with David Brancaccio. David Brancaccio is a master of the industry: he is the former host of NOW on PBS, and current host and senior editor of American Public Media’s Marketplace Morning Report, where he runs two related podcasts per morning.  He also hosts the Esquire Classic podcast from Esquire Magazine and PRX (check it out if you haven’t listened yet!). Find out what David is listening to now:

David Brancaccio in studio
David Brancaccio in studio

What show do you wake up or fall asleep to?
You want to hear my guilty pleasure?  I mean, besides those sleep podcasts that bore you into unconsciousness (not by accident; the ones specifically designed to bore you to sleep). For something energizing, riveting and informative, often charmingly so, I listen to a podcast from the BBC’s domestic service, Radio Four. It is a great podcast that does obituaries, mostly British obituaries. Last Word is a series of profiles of fascinating people whom we lost over the previous week. These are people who had fascinating lives, often previously unknown to me. A punk poet; A Taliban leader; a British physicist who was expert on the electromagnetic properties of nuclear isotopes.  Plus the podcast has a great title: “Last Word“.

What show do you rave to your friends about?
Besides my Esquire Classic podcast—which I ceremoniously stream into a big Bluetooth speaker in the kitchen while we are cooking, so there is no escape—my favorite podcasts are those produced by my buddies. They include Brendan and Rico on Dinner Party DownloadActuality with Marketplace’s Sabri Ben-Achour, and Codebreaker with Marketplace’s Ben Johnson.

David Brancaccio
David Brancaccio

If you were to start your own podcast, what would the subject be?
Last Word inspires a podcast I would like to host someday:  How about an obituary show about people who are just fine and very much alive?  We could could borrow from Monty Python and call my podcast “I’m not Dead!”. Readers of this blog are welcome to suggest a more respectful title.

How do you envision the future of the podcasting landscape?
I must tell you the word “podcasting” will go away. Subscribing to a series of podcasts, in the way one subscribes to a magazine, will go away. But on-demand audio will not go away. Audio storytelling, both factual and fictional, is woven into our DNA. We’ve been doing it since we lived in caves. The future version of “podcasts” will all be available at the flick of a finger or an iris-scanned flick of the eye. Audio had a great advantage: it can be absorbed as we do something else, cooking dinner, driving our not-quite-autonomous vehicles. For both audio creators and listeners, I believe, it will be a lush future.